Deploying RSpace

Scope and intended audience

This document is for IT staff at an organisation that is considering purchasing, or has purchased, RSpace Enterprise.

It aims to provide an overview of deployment options to help guide your decision on how to deploy RSpace.

Where should RSpace be deployed?

This is a fundamental decision for you to make, and there are various options, all of which can be supported and have proven to be workable with existing customers.

1. ResearchSpace operates RSpace as a SaaS offering on AWS

In this scenario, RSpace is deployed on AWS cloud. Installation, backup, updates and maintenance are all performed by ResearchSpace. RSpace can be deployed in any AWS region of your choice to meet your data storage and regulatory requirements. This scenario is good if you:

  • Are unable or unwilling to dedicate staff time to installing and maintaining RSpace.
  • Want complete convenience and to get up and running quickly.
  • Anticipate expanding usage over time - AWS is essentially is unlimited in terms of data storage capability.
2. You install and operate RSpace on-premises

In this scenario, RSpace is installed on your insititutional system - either physical machines, virtual hosts or your private cloud. You can learn more about how to install RSpace. This scenario is good if:

  • Your data-compliance guidelines require you to store research data on-premises.
  • You are able to dedicate some staff time to installing and maintaining RSpace.
  • You have staff with IT experience in managing web applications in a Linux environment.
  • You want absolute ownership and control over all aspects of the data life cycle, for example backup and recovery.
3. ResearchSpace installs and operates RSpace on-premises

This is a hybrid solution, where you want RSpace on-premises but don't want to delegate IT staff time to maintaining the system. In this case, you set up the infrastructure and ResearchSpace will install and maintain the software. Responsibility for backup /disaster recovery is agreed before installation. This scenario is good if:

  • Your data-compliance guidelines require you to store research data on-premises.
  • You have limited desire or ability to dedicate staff time to managing RSpace

RSpace connectivity

RSpace does not operate in isolation from your institutional data; in fact it shines when connecting and linking your research work together. In this section we review how the different deployment options described above affect these aspects of RSpace functionality

Single Sign On

If you want your users to access and login to RSpace using Single Sign On, RSpace supports this for all deployment options, using the SAML2 protocol. Most Identity Providers (e.g. Okta, Azure AD) support this protocol.

Connecting to your existing data storage

RSpace can store and manage all sorts of data files, but there are occasions when your researchers will want to link to data files on an institutional file server rather than bringing the files into RSpace. This might be the case if

  • The data files are huge, e.g. large images or sequencing files.
  • Your data has to be stored on a particular file server for compliance reasons.

RSpace can talk to these servers using either Samba or SFTP protocols. It just requires read access to list files to link to.

This can be easier to set up for an on-prem installation; connecting from RSpace on AWS is entirely possible technically, but requires access from RSpace to your file-server.

RSpace integrations

RSpace has integrations with many popular applications including Dropbox, Google Drive, OneDrive, Microsoft Teams, Slack, Office 365, protocols.io, Github, Figshare and Dataverse- see Integrations for a full list. The setup required for each integration is variable. If you are running RSpace as a SaaS (option 1 above) , ResearchSpace will be able to set up these integrations for you. If you are running RSpace on-prem (or, more specifically, the RSpace URL is not a researchspace.com URL), then you will have to configure these integrations, as they often require proof of domain ownership to set up (e.g. Google Drive).

Getting data out of RSpace

RSpace supports export to all standard formats - HTML, XML, PDF, Microsoft Word and JSON (via RSpace API). Users can export their data themselves, at any level of granularity from a single document to their entire body of work, at any time, and download the export to their own machines. Exports can be scheduled using the API - e.g. running a cron-job to invoke export once a week.

If as a server administrator you want to do low-level data export, this is easily accomplished using standard, free tools. ELN metadata can be exported from the MySQL database using `mysqldump` or `Percona XtraBackup`), and from its internal file store via tools such as `rsync`.

No data is stored in a binary format proprietary to RSpace.

Sensitive data

Standard on prem and hosted RSpace deployments are not appropriate for entry of sensitive (e.g. patient) data.   It is certainly possible, however, to deploy RSpace so that entry of sensitive data is supported and compliant.  Often, this issue comes up where usage in a medical school is planned.   In these situations, a solution is to deploy RSpace within a compliant environment. Because of the increased cost of data storage and processing in these environments, it may make sense to deploy a second instance of RSpace specifically for researchers who handle sensitive data, and leave the other RSpace for use by the majority of users, who don't need the extra 'compliance wrap'.

In the USA, AWS GovCloud offers a compliant computing environment for organisations bound by federal data-handling regulations. RSpace has been installed successfully in this environment.

Migration after a pilot

Customers often run a pilot of RSpace on AWS, before deciding to purchase an ongoing license. In that case you can decide whether to continue using the cloud instance as a production instance, or switching to an on-premises deployment. If you chose to move to an on-premises deployment it's possible to migrate data researchers have entered into the cloud instance to the on-premises instance of RSpace.


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